hierarchical-aestheticism:

Vitezlav Karel Masek (1865-1927), The Prophetess Libuse

hierarchical-aestheticism:

Vitezlav Karel Masek (1865-1927), The Prophetess Libuse

(via demoniality)

virusjones:

Rjukan, Norway

virusjones:

Rjukan, Norway

(via crystalwitchery)

templeofapelles:

An Incantation, 1773 John British Dixon (after John Hamilton Mortimer)

templeofapelles:

An Incantation, 1773
John British Dixon
(after John Hamilton Mortimer)

(via dianaandpansson)

iopanosiris:

wilburwhateley:

Santiago Caruso

  • Labyrinth Maker (homage to Borges)
  • Messenger

*I’m a little obsessed with him right now, so bear with me.  :) 

I’m posting and reblogging quite a bit of Caruso myself. This is seasonal (sort of) so there’s my excuse.

siciliancunningcraft:

Assembling an Ancestor Altar
Items needed: -White table cloth, with an optional red runner -Images of your departed (absolutely NO living persons are to be included in these images) -Glass of water to invite and refresh the spirits -White Candle, to light their way -Offerings, the best offerings for your ancestors are the things that they enjoyed in life
Other items, such as things that they may have possessed in life that you have inherited, are good additions as well. Images of family patron saints are also usually honored here to show that these saints who have served your family are welcomed as part of your family.  These altars may be erected anywhere but during special feast days, such as All Soul’s Day and an ancestor’s birthday, the best idea is to set up a temporary altar (like the one pictured above) in the family’s dining room so that the departed may join in with the lives of the living.  Remember that the dead are to be honored and given the utmost respect! One’s ancestors are his greatest intercessors and allies, these are the one’s you pray to as well as the ones who pray for you. No one has more influence over the living and over this world than those who are no longer a part of it.

siciliancunningcraft:

Assembling an Ancestor Altar

Items needed:
-White table cloth, with an optional red runner
-Images of your departed (absolutely NO living persons are to be included in these images)
-Glass of water to invite and refresh the spirits
-White Candle, to light their way
-Offerings, the best offerings for your ancestors are the things that they enjoyed in life

Other items, such as things that they may have possessed in life that you have inherited, are good additions as well. Images of family patron saints are also usually honored here to show that these saints who have served your family are welcomed as part of your family.
These altars may be erected anywhere but during special feast days, such as All Soul’s Day and an ancestor’s birthday, the best idea is to set up a temporary altar (like the one pictured above) in the family’s dining room so that the departed may join in with the lives of the living.
Remember that the dead are to be honored and given the utmost respect! One’s ancestors are his greatest intercessors and allies, these are the one’s you pray to as well as the ones who pray for you. No one has more influence over the living and over this world than those who are no longer a part of it.

(via iopanosiris)

Now that we finally moved in and are starting to settle in, I’m slowly putting together what will be the witchcraft/recreational room. 
Really excited to set everything up and start painting and trying new spells!

Now that we finally moved in and are starting to settle in, I’m slowly putting together what will be the witchcraft/recreational room.
Really excited to set everything up and start painting and trying new spells!

martinlkennedy:

Untitled by Nick Hyde (1970). From the book Visions (1975, published by Pomegranate).

martinlkennedy:

Untitled by Nick Hyde (1970). From the book Visions (1975, published by Pomegranate).

(via weird-doe)

fleurdulys:

A Moonlit Winter Landscape - Remy van Haanen
19th century

fleurdulys:

A Moonlit Winter Landscape - Remy van Haanen

19th century

(via nightofpan)

sorornex:

From Leigh McCloskey’s Grimoire

sorornex:

From Leigh McCloskey’s Grimoire

(via nightofpan)